DANGER! Choking Hazard! Size Matters! Orbee Tuff Balls for Less!

Ellie_SizeMost of us who pitch an occasional ball or play sports think little about matching the diameter of the ball to fit our dogs.

SIZE MATTERS! A medium or large dog should not play with any ball that could become lodged in their throats or stuck in their mouth.

It’s rare, but I’ve known dogs who have choked to death while their owners watched. Balls that are just a bit too large for small dogs can be compressed to fit into the mouth, where they flex back to original size and become stuck. Think about your dog’s safety during play!

My Australian terrier dog, Bentley destroys tennis balls in minutes! There are only a few types of balls that hold up to his destructive chewing. I’ve found a goldmine of incredibly durable balls made by Orbee. Bentley can compress, chew and squeeze the Orbee balls, but they do not easily rip and tear.

Orbee makes tough balls, in all sizes. Here is a sampling of the selection. Click the images below to purchase the perfect size Orbee Tough Ball from Sit Stay, a trusted on line dog supply store. You will not find it at a better price! Plus, I’ll get 8% of your purchase to help fund this FREE informational web site!


Visit SitStay.com Today

Orbee Tough Ball – Small 2.25″, Medium 3.25″, Large 4.25″ .

Orbee-Tuff Ball, Small
Click the image to visit Sit Stay and order Orbee Tough Ball – 2 1/4″ Small, 3 1/4″ Medium or 4 1/4″ Large.

2 1/2″ Orbee Tuff Fetch Ball – Same size as normal tennis balls.

Orbee-Tuff Fetch Ball
Click the image to visit Sit Stay and order Orbee 2 1/2″ Fetch Ball.

3″ Baseball

Orbee Baseball
CLICK the image to visit Sit Stay and order Orbee 3″ Baseball.


3.25″ Orbee Tuff Glow for Good Ball

Orbee-Tuff Glow for Good Ball
CLICK the image to visit Sit Stay and order Orbee 3 1/4″ Glow Ball.


Orbee 5″ Soccer Ball

Orbee Soccer Ball
CLICK the image to visit Sit Stay and order 5″ tuff soccer ball today!

Happy Training!

Alan J Turner – Companion Animal Behavior Counselor and Trainer, Canine Specialization

How’s Bentley – Memphis, Collierville, Germantown TN

21st Century Canine Relationship Solutions

Group Dog Obedience Classes

Private Dog Training in Memphis TN

Reactive Dog Specialist

iPhone 3Gs Video ** Do it or Suffer: Your Weimaraner Needs Exercise!

WeimaranerToday I went with my clients, Derrick and Megan, to Shelby Farms to exercise Bimmer, their 1 year old Weimaraner dog. Scroll to the bottom of this post to watch 2 iPhone 3Gs videos of Bimmer playing fetch.

I first met the clients January 2009, when Bimmer was a puppy. Derrick and Megan were model students, and it shows. Bimmer was an excellent guest at the dog park. Derrick and Meagan have a wonderful Weimaraner dog who is well mannered and loads of fun! That’s not the case with owners who do not obedience train or exercise their dogs.

If you do NOT teach your puppy basic obedience and provide enough stimulation for your dog, problems will emerge. Excessive digging, escaping, jumping, barking, chewing, and destruction are common signs that an untrained dog’s needs are not being met.

At 4.500 acres and 20 bodies of water, Shelby Farms is one of the largest municipal park in the USA.

In the lower picture, Bimmer has a fire hose fetch toy. I could throw this toy much farther than the plastic retrieving dummy. Dogs seem to really like fire hose material. Although it’s not a chew toy, the texture is a bit different and the fire hose is very durable. Amazon has a great selection. Here’s the best one I’ve found at the best price.

Weimaraner Fetch

Click below to see 2 videos taken with iPhone 3Gs. The Splash is my favorite!

Fetch

Splash

Happy Training!
Alan J Turner – How’s Bentley – 21st Century Canine Relationship Solutions
Reactive Dog Group Workshops
Mini-Obedience Courses
Group and Private Dog Training in Memphis, Collierville, Germantown, Bartlett TN

New iPhone app -Dog and Puppy Shake – Fun Facts and Trainer Truths
21st Century Dogs – Dog and Puppy Club

Want to Teach Your 10 Week Old Puppy to Sit? Forget About it. :) It’s Too late. . .


SItDid you want to teach your 10 week old puppy to sit? Forget about it. 🙂 It’s too late.

That turbo charged puppy already knows how to perform every basic obedience command!

Your dog knows how to sit and lie down. He can stay.  Your pup knows how to walk towards you. Your puppy knows how to run to you. Your puppy dog can walk the same speed as you. That fellow knows how to dig, or “not dig”. Your puppy can bark, and he knows how to “not bark”.  He can certainly choose to jump up, or “not jump up”.

Your goals are to learn how to communicate to your dog WHEN, WHERE, HOW LONG, and WHY he or she should perform basic commands.  You will succeed if you build a relationship based on clear communication, and well managed rewards for cooperation.

21st Century dogs live in our homes and sleep in our bedrooms. Unlike most of the the last century when dogs were outside pets or workers, raising a dog to live inside your home requires much more than basic obedience.

Your dog’s behaviors are influenced by your behaviors, and the  relationship between you and your dog.

My goal is to help you achieve your goals via private or group services, and by providing free information.


Happy Training!

Alan J Turner – How’s Bentley Memphis TN

How to Teach your Dog to Drop or Give

Australia Terrier Bentley
Australian Terrier Bentley

Description:

The dog releases an item from his or her mouth.

Function:

Final step in “Fetch”, or anytime you want the dog to release an item from his or her mouth. When teaching fetch, teach give or drop first, and the other steps like carrying the ball and finding the ball will naturally fall into place.

Before you begin training your dog, you’ll need to learn a bit about communication and motivation. Please visit the Dog Training Start Here Category. There you will learn about markers and rewards, two excellent topics for communicating and motivating! A prerequisite for “stay” is “Attention on Cue”. It doesn’t hurt if your dog already knows “Sit” too!

Considerations / Prerequisites:

Where do you want to dog to place the item? –  on the floor, on the table, in your lap, in your hand, in a basket, in another’s hand, in another room?  Do you want to dog to sit or lie down before the drop?

Some dogs quit “holding” items after 2 or 3 trials. You may need to teach “Hold”, “Sit”, “Place”, Down”, “Leave-It”, or, try again later.

The balance between the value of the item and the value of the treat is important.  If your dog is not dropping the item before you open your fist by trial 5, reconsider your item and treat choices. Begin practicing with a tennis ball or other fetch toy and use high value treats. When your dog “catches on”, use other items that do not belong to the dog and lesser value treats!

Your task is to mark (or click) the instant the dog releases the item. When following the instructions, be ready to click regardless of where in the sequence the dog releases the item. Many dogs will release before you finish the sequence of steps.

These instructions are a sort of guide. You can adapt the instructions to fit you and your dog. You may not need all the steps. The goal of this post is to teach a concept. The general concept is:

  1. Get the Behavior to Occur
  2. Mark the Instant it Occurs
  3. Deliver some sort of reward


Visual Cue: Handler holds his or her right fist directly in front of right shoulder.

Audible Cue: Handler speaks, “Drop” or “Give”.

Teach Drop

Trial 1:

  • Say “Drop”, pause 1 second.
  • Present fist with treat (visual cue), pause 1 second.
  • Push your fist forward (palm down) until your fist is directly in front of the dog’s nose, pause 1 second.
  • Rotate your fist until it is palm up, pause 1 second.
  • Open fist to reveal treat. Mark the instant the dog releases the item. Give treat.
  • Pick up item and give it back to the dog.

Trial 2:

  • Say “Drop”, pause 2 seconds.
  • Present fist with treat (visual cue), pause 2 seconds.
  • Push your fist forward (palm down) until your fist is directly in front of the dog’s nose, pause 2 seconds.
  • Rotate your fist until it is palm up, pause 2 seconds.
  • Open fist to reveal treat. Mark the instant the dog releases the item. Give treat.
  • Pick up item and give it back to the dog.

Trial 3:

  • Say “Drop”, pause 3 seconds.
  • Present fist with treat (visual cue), pause 3 seconds.
  • Push your fist forward (palm down) until your fist is directly in front of the dog’s nose, pause 3 seconds.
  • Rotate your fist until it is palm up, pause 3 seconds.
  • Open fist to reveal treat. Mark the instant the dog releases the item. Give treat.
  • Pick up item and give it back to the dog.

Trial 4 -xx:

Follow the same sequence, but omit the treat in your fist on trials 4 and above.  Add 1 second to the sequence of pauses.  Most dogs learn this very quickly, and will drop when you say “drop” within 2-3 trials. That’s okay if your dog doesn’t, just add 1 second every new trial. For example, if you make it to Trial 7, you will have 7 second pauses in the trial.

Once your dog learns to Drop or Give on command, practice with items and toys of all shapes and sizes. You can discontinue the marker and food treat reward. The reward is you throwing the ball again!
Happy Training
Alan J Turner – How’s Bentley Memphis
Private Dog Trainer, Group Dog Obedience in Collierville and Downtown Memphis

Lucy the Goldendoodle in Mississippi River Flood – Memphis

img_0265Lucy was retrieving like a full blooded Labrador Retriever today! The 1.5 year old female Goldendoodle was quite excited to be splashing and running in shallow flood waters of the Mississippi River. She was absolutely on target and would not come back without the treasured stick!

Lucy quickly made friends, and competed with two other dogs, but Lucy always came back with the stick! GO LUCY!

I work with Goldendoodles and/or Labradoodles every week. They are a popular and excellent mix! The retriever genes fuel the gentle, cooperative, “Oooookay” attitude of a Labrador or Golden Retriever. The Standard Poodle genes might say, “Why should I?, What’s in it for me?” They are excellent dogs if you meet their exercise and stimulation needs AND provide basic obedience training!

I took these pictures of the Mississippi River in Memphis TN. The river is the second longest in the USA and the largest by volume.

Today in Memphis TN, May 17th, 2009, the river is above the 34 foot flood stage. It is expected to crest at 34.5 feet. At 35 feet, most of the land within the mainline levee system will be flooded. Yikes! The National Weather Service issued a flood watch.

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Alan J Turner, Companion Animal Behavior Counselor & Trainer, Canine Specialization

Private and Group Dog Training in Memphis, TN

Owner: How’s Bentley