Short Dog Training Sessions Should End With Success

ShortsessionsI always ask my clients to practice with their dogs during short sessions throughout the day. For puppies and dogs that are learning look and sit (the first 2 commands), I recommend 5 sessions each day, for 60 seconds per session.

As the dog is introduced to more commands, such as here, stay and down, the sessions will be  longer. How you end the longer sessions makes a difference!

Cool down before ending a session. During your short teaching sessions, respect the fact that learning a new task or raising the difficulty for a task (for example- practicing ‘stays’ with more distractions or increased duration) can be somewhat stressful for your dog.

I think it’s somewhat impolite, rude, or disrespectful to “push” your dog’s performance to a very high level and then immediately end the session.

To give your dog a break, end each session with a couple of easy behaviors that your dog already knows. After teaching, hold a play session or go for a walk.

Following this recipe will keep your dog relaxed about learning. He will anticipate the next session with joy! Your main goal is to teach your dog so make it easy for him/her to be successful!

Happy Training!

Alan J Turner – Companion Animal Behavior Counselor and Trainer, Canine Specialization

How’s Bentley – Memphis, Collierville, Germantown TN

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Untrained Dog Misbehaving? Attach a Leash. You are a Zookeeper.


German Shepherd DogIf you have a new puppy or dog, you need to manage the environment so your puppy does not practice rude behaviors. Use baby gates, crates, leashes, tethers to control your pup’s access to territory.

Many people overlook the most basic tool for controlling a dog inside the house, the leash. It’s a neat device that has a coupler on one end that attaches to your dog’s collar.

Several times a week, I hear people say, “my dog jumps up on guests or runs out the door at every opportunity”?   I suspect these people do not have a leash attached!

Off leash obedience is an advanced skill. No one would take their untrained dog for a walk, next to Poplar avenue, without attaching a leash. Why? Because they know their dogs are likely to go into the street, or chase a car ,or otherwise get into trouble.  They realize their dog is not trained, does not respond to voice commands, and they manage the environment by attaching a leash. With a leash attached, the dog is safely connected and unable to make stupid choices. GREAT!

Off leash obedience is an advanced skill, regardless if the location is inside or outside. Instead of waiting for your puppy to make mistakes, and attempting to teach via corrections, help your puppy make the right choices and reinforce good behaviors with rewards. You can kindly prevent your utrained dog from jumping up on guests, counter surfing, getting into the trash, or other wise destroying your home by attaching a leash or tether.

The long term solution for naughty behaviors is simple. Learn how to train your dog and then do it!

Here is an outline of your tasks:

Dog Training Success

  • Meet your dog’s social, emotional and physical needs.
  • Kindly prevent your pet from practicing unwanted behaviors. Attach a leash.
  • Learn how to tell your dog exactly what you want.
  • Learn how to motivate your dog to want the same things as you.
  • Change your behaviors in order to change your dog’s behaviors.
  • Form a global training plan.
  • Teach your dog coping skills.
  • Teach your dog basic commands.
  • Practice with your dog every day.
  • Practice with your dog in many different locations.
  • Practice with your dog while increasing the level of distractions.
  • Practice with your dog on a short leash, and then on a long line – before you go off leash.

Happy Training!

Alan J Turner

Certified Companion Animal Behavior Counselor & Trainer – Canine Specialization

Neutrality, Patience, Observation, Adjustments – the Keys to Successful Dog Training

ATNeutralI am just like you. I want my dog to perform well.

But, I am neutral to success or failures when training an animal. What I mean is, during training sessions, I don’t care if the dog obeys, or does not obey.

It’s okay if the dog performs as asked. It’s okay if the dog does not perform.

If the dog obeys, great! I know that with this dog at this point in time, in this context, my current training plan, methods and strategies are effective.

If the dog does not obey, great! I know that with this dog, at this point in time, in this context, my current training plan, methods and strategies are ineffective. Now I know what does not work and I’ll make adjustments and try again.

Emotions interefere with thinking. One must separate the two in order to be an excellent animal trainer. If I become emotional, frustrated, it clouds my ability to think, observe and adjust.

Voluntary behaviors are like common stock. There are 3 possible “directions”. Over time, a behavior can increase (in frequency of occurances and magnitude), decrease or remain the same.

Observe, analyize, adjust.
All good trainers log instances of the target behavior and record the frequency of the behavior over time. Then we make adjustments until the frequency of the behavior is as desired.

If the behavior is increasing or maintaining the same frequency today as yesterday, I know that something in the environment is triggering the behavior. I know the immediate consequence is a reinforcer.

If the behavior is decreasing in frequency (occurs kess today than yesterday), I know that something in the environment is distracting the dog or triggering another behavior, and/or I know the immediate consequence is a punisher.

If you want to modify a behavior (increase or decrease the frequency), you will make adjustments in the environment before the behavior, and make adjustments in the consequences during or immediately after the behavior.

If the behavior is unwanted, naughty behavior, you should ask youself exactly what do you want the dog TO do and where should she do it? This is the alternate behavior. Identify all the components and teach and practice the alternate behavior.

For instance, let’s discuss “dog jumps up on guests” behavior. The behavior is strong and occurs as often today as it did yesterday.

Your first step is to prevent the dog from practicing this rude greeting.

Identify the triggers in the environment. Dog is untrained, in the same area as guests, and is not restrained. Change any one of these three triggers and the behavior will be reduced in frequency.

Identify the immediate consequences. Guests probably touch or praise the dog, or reach out with their hands and
push. You may be grabbing the dog’s collar and / or saying “off”. All of these immediate consequences are not helpful, because the behavior is strong.

If your response is anger or frustration, you are off track, and will have a difficult time fixing the problem.

The solution for “jumping up on guests” behavior:
Prevent the behavior by attaching a leash before guests enter your home. Set aside time to train your dog, when you can control the distractions. Teach and practice an alternate behavior such as go-to-place, sit, spin, “parade with toy”.

Most importantly, be neutral so you can observe, think, adjust and succeed!

Happy Training!

AA-1 Steps to Success – Think Like a Trainer

quickstart1jpgSteps to Success

– Dog Training Theory

– Too often, a puppy is brought into the home and our methods of teaching consist of “screaming no” and “swatting with a newspaper”. I know that’s how I did it before I learned about animal learning and behavior! How primitive.

Stubborn Dogs

Many clients begin our conversations by exclaiming their dogs know Sit and Come, but refuse to perform. The next phrases during these discussions are “she refuses to listen to me when visitors come into the house”, or “she refuses to come inside when I call her.”  She knows what she is supposed to do, but she is stubborn”

My experiences have taught me that it’s rarely a stubborn refusal to sit or come.

Training method flaws and lofty expectations are the root causes for these failures.

In many cases the client doesn’t understand how to motivate their dogs to comply. In other cases, the client has never practiced in those situations and the dogs are not prepared to succeed.

The dogs cannot match the owners’ expectations because the owners have not prepared the dogs for real life environments.

Many of us expect college level performances from a dog that has only been practicing in kindergarten settings.

Our dogs need to practice in controlled environments before we can expect them to perform in exciting situations.

Door Manners

For example, suppose your goal is teach your pup to ‘relax-when-people-visit’. Identify all the skills and behaviors that make up ‘relax-when-people-visit’ behavior. Teach and practice each skill with various levels of distractions.

First you might teach the dog to sit, down, and relax inside your house when it is quiet. Next, you might practice when house members are sitting…. standing…. walking….. passing doorways……waving their arms, clapping, jumping, et cetera.

Once your dog can sit, down and relax inside the house with house members as the distractions, you start all over and practice with family members entering the house. Finally, you practice the same sequences with willing visitors.

You should hold these practice sessions when you have total control of the classroom environment. That is – when you can guide your dog into choosing the correct behaviors. Set up the environment so your dog has limited choices of which behaviors to perform. Once he masters the current level of distraction, introduce another, higher level distraction.

During these well planned practice sessions, your dog has only a few choices. Because you have a leash attached, none of those choices include mug-the-people behaviors!


Edward Thorndike’s Law of Effect

“Of several responses made to the same situation, those which are accompanied or closely followed by satisfaction to the animal will, other things being equal, be more firmly connected with the situation, so that, when it recurs, they will be more likely to recur; those which are accompanied or closely followed by discomfort to the animal will, other things being equal, have their connections with that situation weakened, so that, when it recurs, they will be less likely to occur. The greater the satisfaction or discomfort, the greater the strengthening or weakening of the bond.”

Here’s a definition I pulled from WikEd.

The law of effect is the idea that behaviors are selected by their consequences. Behavior that is repeated is often followed by a desired consequence and behavior that is not repeated had previously been followed by a bad consequence.

The key to animal friendly teaching is to initially get the animal to perform the behavior and then reinforce the behavior via positive reinforcement or rewards.

The steps for perfecting all new behaviors are identical.

  • Get the Behavior.
  • Tell your dog when it occurs.
  • Deliver some sort of reward.
  • Practice the behavior in various, controlled settings while adding distractions.
  • Practice the behavior in real life.

Get the Behavior

I’m sure you’ve noticed. It’s impossible to use positive reinforcement to increase behaviors if the behaviors never occur.

There are all sorts of actions one can use to get a particular behavior to occur. For instance, standing and leaning into a dog’s space might a useful tool for getting the dog to sit. If you use this tool, don’t forget to move back into a neutral position the instant the dog sits.

Other dogs move away when you crowd their space. When teaching these dogs, stepping away or leaning out of the dog’s space might be useful tools for getting the sit to happen.

Both of these body movements (leaning in or out) have an effect on the environment; sometimes the effect is useful, other times it’s not. It depends on the dog, the environment, the handler, et cetera.

Professional trainers are experts at getting the behavior to occur; not because we know exactly what will work with every animal, but because we are constantly and delicately changing the environment until we “get” the desired behavior.

Professional trainers are always aware of body language, tone of voice, value of the food treats, dog’s state of hunger, distractions, et cetera.

We manipulate these and other conditions in the environment until we get the behavior. Sooner than later, we hit on the right combination.

There are many methods to get behaviors, some work well for already learned behaviors and others are for teaching.

Here is a list of methods that trainers use to get a behavior to occur.

  • Cue
  • Capture
  • Lure
  • Shape
  • Target

Canine Success

  • Meet your dog’s social, emotional and physical needs.
  • Kindly prevent your pet from practicing unwanted behaviors.
  • Learn how to tell your dog exactly what you want.
  • Learn how to motivate your dog to want the same things as you.
  • Change your behaviors in order to change your dog’s behaviors.
  • Crate train your puppy. (a crate trained pup will relax in the crate when the family is home and throwing a party.)
  • House train your puppy.
  • Teach your puppy about play biting.
  • Socialize your puppy.
  • Form a global training plan.
  • Teach your dog coping skills.
  • Teach your dog basic commands.
  • Practice with your dog every day.
  • Practice with your dog in many different locations.
  • Practice with your dog while increasing the level of distractions.
  • Practice with your dog on a short leash, and then on a long line – before you go off leash.

Off Leash Obedience

Off leash obedience is an advanced skill.

Master all commands on a short leash, and then practice at a distance on a long line. Practice in areas with few distractions, then in areas with more distractions – on a long line.

Once your dog will obey on the long line in all situations, then you can go off lead!


Happy Training!

Alan J Turner, Companion Animal Behavior Counselor & Trainer – Canine Specialization

Private and Group Dog Training in Memphis, TN

Owner: How’s Bentley